Collection

WAKABAYASHI Isamu

[1936 - 2003 ]

Tree Bark and Vacant Land - Paulownia Tree [2002]

  • wood, copper, iron, paper, ink
    dimensions variable
  • ©WAKABAYASHI STUDIO

Walnut Leaves [1994-96]

  • walnut leaf, copper, ink, paper, wood, iron, aluminum
    dimensions variable
  • ©WAKABAYASHI STUDIO

Possession, Atmosphere, Oscillation - On the Invasion of Grass and Personal Belongings I [1984]

  • iron, copper, heater
    36.4×183.0×91.6cm
  • ©WAKABAYASHI STUDIO

One Hundred Raindrops I [1976]

  • copper, iron, brass
    12.6×100.0×100.0cm
  • ©WAKABAYASHI STUDIO

Study I for Oscillating Scale [1976-77]

  • wood, lead, iron
    22.0×22.0×145.0cm
  • ©WAKABAYASHI STUDIO

Three Dimensional Note - Gas, Solid, Liquid and Present I [1973]

  • wood, gouache, ink
    5.5×35.1×14.9cm
  • ©WAKABAYASHI STUDIO

One Hundred Envious View [1967-72]

  • a series of drawing selected by the artist
    101 pieces
  • ©WAKABAYASHI STUDIO

To Thermal Metamorphosis II (3rd Stage) [1965, 90]

  • iron
    101.0×30.0×42.0cm
  • ©WAKABAYASHI STUDIO

Grand Landscape (4th Stage) [1964, 91]

  • aluminum, iron, wood
    54.0×134.5×55.0cm
  • ©WAKABAYASHI STUDIO

[Audio Guide]

The head and forelegs of a dog have been fashioned out of an iron framework like you might find on a construction site. Lumps of wood that also look like building materials line the section corresponding to the dog’s back. Looking closer, one end tapers to a point as if it were the dog’s tail. If we get even closer and look from directly above, the center of the elongated wood configuration is curved, and it has a silhouette that resembles the main island of the Japanese archipelago. If we view the work with this in mind, the gentle, cone-shaped protrusion can be seen as a symbol for the Japanese landscape. This interpretation fits with the “Grand Landscape” mentioned in the title. As a sculptor, Wakabayashi has an intense interest in the surface of his works. If we broaden our gaze, the surfaces of the things around us come to form the topography of the landscape, even the topography of the Earth’s surface. Through creating a sculpture, Wakabayashi has the sensation of viewing the Japanese archipelago from the sky.

Archive

Collection Audio Guide